Accessibility Tools

  • Content scaling 100%
  • Font size 100%
  • Line height 100%
  • Letter spacing 100%
Contrast A A A Link to Twitter page Accessiblity Tools

Information on Coronavirus (Covid-19)

View the latest advice, guidance and information about coronavirus. For health information and advice, read our pages on coronavirus. For the government’s response to Coronavirus click here. For information to support health and social care employees in Shropshire, Telford & Wrekin login here.

Covid-19

Information on fertility, pregnancy and breastfeeding

Posted in Our priorities

The Joint Committee on Vaccination and Immunisation (JCVI) has advised that pregnant women should be offered COVID-19 vaccines.  In the USA, around 90,000 pregnant women have been vaccinated, mainly with Pfizer and Moderna vaccines, and no safety concerns have been identified.

Evidence on COVID-19 vaccines is being continuously reviewed by the World Health Organization and the regulatory bodies in the UK, USA, Canada and Europe.

Although the overall risk from COVID-19 disease in pregnant women and their new babies is low, in later pregnancy some women may become seriously unwell and need hospital treatment.

Pregnant women with COVID-19 have a higher risk of admission to an intensive care unit than women of the same age who are not pregnant. Women with COVID-19 disease are also 2-3 times more likely to have their babies early than women without COVID-19. Pregnant women with underlying clinical conditions are at even higher risk of suffering serious complications from COVID-19. 

There is no need to avoid getting pregnant after COVID-19 vaccination.

There is no evidence that COVID-19 vaccines have any effect on fertility or your chances of becoming pregnant. 

The first dose of COVID-19 vaccine will give you good protection. You need the second dose to get longer lasting protection. You do not need to delay this second dose. 

The Royal College of Obstetricians and Gynaecologists (RCOG) and Royal College of Midwives (RCM) have a decision guide and other information you may find helpful COVID-19 vaccines and pregnancy (rcog.org.uk – www.rcm.org.uk/guidance-for-pregnant-women).

If you would like to discuss COVID-19 vaccination please contact your midwife, doctor, or nurse.

Whether you're trying for a baby, a parent-to-be or new parent, the wellbeing and welfare of your baby is vital.

That's why it's important to protect yourself against coronavirus (COVID-19). 

You can be vaccinated if:

  • you’re pregnant or think you might be
  • you’re breastfeeding
  • you’re trying for a baby or might get pregnant in the future

Read more from the NHS website: Pregnancy, breastfeeding and fertility

Read more from Royal College of Obstetricians and Gynaecologists: Coronavirus (COVID-19) infection and pregnancy information

 

The Joint Committee on Vaccination and Immunisation (JCVI) has advised that pregnant women should be offered COVID-19 vaccines at the same time as people of the same age or risk group. In the USA, around 90,000 pregnant women have been vaccinated mainly with Pfizer and Moderna vaccines and no safety concerns have been identified.

Evidence on COVID-19 vaccines is being continuously reviewed by the World Health Organization and the regulatory bodies in the UK, USA, Canada and Europe.

Pfizer and Moderna vaccines are the preferred vaccines for pregnant women of any age who are coming for their first dose.

Anyone who has already started vaccination and is offered a second dose whilst pregnant, should have a second dose with the same vaccine unless they had a serious side effect after the first dose.

 

Commonly asked questions about the COVID vaccines, pregnancy, fertility and breastfeeding.

 

I'm trying for a baby, should I get the vaccine?

Yes. It's recommended that everyone who's had their invitation for vaccination has there. This includes those who are trying to have a baby as well as those who are thinking about having a baby.

Can any of the COVID-19 vaccines affect fertility?

No. There is no evidence that any of the vaccines can affect fertility.

I'm pregnant, should I get the vaccine? 

Yes. The COVID-19 vaccines offer pregnant women the best protection against COVID-19, which can be serious in later pregnancy for some women. 

Can I breastfeed after getting the vaccine?

Yes. You can breastfeed after getting the COVID-19 vaccines. 

How can I book my vaccine? 

If you're eligible, you can book your vaccine online, by calling 111, or by visiting a walk-in or pop up clinic. Find out more here

Find out more. 

Find out more about COVID-19 vaccines and pregnancy on the gov.uk website or Royal College of Midwives website. There's also an easy read guide for all women of childbearing age, those currently pregnant or breastfeeding on coronavirus (COVID-19) vaccination from Public Health England.  

Tags: COVID-19 COVID19

Contact Us

Shropshire, Telford & Wrekin ICS
Fourth Floor
The Shirehall
Abbey Foregate,
Shrewsbury, SY2 6LY

Contact us by Email